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Element 25 Produces First Batch of High-purity Electrolytic Manganese

Element 25 has successfully produced the first batch of high-purity electrolytic manganese metal at its project in Australia.

Manganese explorer Element 25 (ASX:E25) has successfully produced the first batch of high-purity electrolytic manganese metal (EMM) from ore mined at its Butcherbird project in Australia.

The ore used to make the EMM was recovered during leach test work at the site.

The Butcherbird ore produced approximately 13 liters of high-purity leach solution containing around 40 grams per liter of manganese.

These initial results from the sighter leach tests were completed using smaller samples from a larger bulk test sample that was about 500 kilograms. The remainder of the sample is now being processed.

The sighter tests were initiated with the intention of further optimizing the quality of the deposit. The Australian battery metals developer’s end goal is to use Butcherbird ores to produce high-purity manganese, including battery-grade manganese sulfate and EMM.

“The success of the test work carried out to date further confirms the process flowsheet which is a key enabling technology for the Company’s strategy of producing high value, high purity manganese products from the Butcherbird project,” Justin Brown, E25’s executive director, noted in the press release.

“The Butcherbird project hosts Australia’s largest onshore manganese deposit and is the focus of a prefeasibility study due for completion in 2019,” he added.

To date, the company has completed a positive scoping study and is working towards developing the deposit in order to produce high-purity manganese sulfate destined for lithium-ion battery cathodes. The EMM that will be produced at Butcherbird will be used as an alloy for specialty steels.

Last year, Element 25 upgraded its initial resource estimate for the deposit, which has been pegged in excess of 180 million tonnes of manganese ore. The company also assessed the indicated resource at the Yanenri Ridge area of the site at 22.4 million tonnes.

“Upgrading the Butcherbird manganese resource to JORC 2012 and the conversion of parts of Yanneri Ridge from inferred to indicated categories adds to our confidence that this is a technically robust mineral deposit with simple geology, low strip ratios and significant potential to underpin the company’s transition from explorer to developer in the medium term,” Brown said at the time.

From here, the manganese firm will work towards completing a prefeasibility study by the end of 2019.

Shares of Element 25 were trading at AU$0.185 on Wednesday (November 28).

Don’t forget to follow us @INN_Resource for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Georgia Williams, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

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A subsection of the booming fintech sector, innovative payment services are experiencing a hay day.

Paytech is just what it sounds like — technology for payments. In Australia, changes to open banking laws plus the need for contactless payments through the global pandemic has meant a major uptake in paytech services.

There are more than 1 million Aussies shopping online each month as different parts of the nation continue to be under COVID-related lockdowns and stay at home orders.


A subsection of the booming fintech sector, innovative payment services are experiencing a hay day. Paytech options are everywhere, with examples like mobile, peer-to-peer, cryptocurrency payments and international payments.

5 Biggest ASX Paytech Stocks

The Investing News Network looked at the biggest paytech stocks on TradingView sorted by Market cap. Data for this list was obtained on September 30, 2021.

1. Afterpay (ASX:APT)

Market cap: AU$35.37 billion

The startup founded in Sydney's eastern suburbs five years ago is now a global brand and employs some 700 people globally serving millions of customers. The brand name has become a verb for buy now pay later — "I'll after pay it." AfterPay was acquired by giant payments provider Square for AU$39 billion in August 2021. Group Total Income for FY21 was 78 percent higher than the previous year at AU$924.7 million, and Afterpay Income increased by 90 percent.

Early investors have reaped the benefits of AfterPay's booming rewards. An investigation by the Australian Financial Review found singer John Farnham and wife Jillian started investing in 2017 when share prices were low and today they hold 36,304 shares at a value of close to AU$3.2 million.

2. Sezzle (ASX:SZL)

Market cap: AU$1.13 billion

Sezzle is the Certified B Corp buy now pay later option that listed on the ASX in 2019. Often dubbed the "mini-Afterpay," the business is based in Minneapolis, US, and has been trying to make "Just Sezzle it" happen since it formed in 2016. The company serves customers mostly in North America, with plans to expand to India.

The company reported an after-tax loss of US$30.4 million for the six months ending June 30, 2021, and it saw an income increase of 159 percent for the same period, alongside an increase of 102 percent in costs.

3. Openpay Group (ASX:OPY)

Market cap: AU$173.92 million

Another Australian buy now pay later offering is Openpay, which offers payment plans of up to 24 months and up to AU$20,000. Openpay started in 2013 for Australia and New Zealand, expanded in 2019 to the UK and reached the US in 2020 under the brand name Opy. This contributed to a growth of 44 percent in income for FY21 of AU$26.3 million.

The company positions itself as a financially responsible business for a mature audience wanting funding for life affirming things like home improvement projects. Unlike Afterpay, Openpay does perform credit checks on all clients through their B2B offering, a SaaS-based platform Openpay for Business.

4. Cirralto (ASX:CRO)

Market cap: AU$167.19 million

Cirralto is a transaction services business that supplies a broad range of B2B payment services and a fully integrated digital payment and business software solution known as Spenda. It aims to help businesses to improve their processes and payment terms to so the businesses can get paid faster.

Cirralto's FY21 has been strong, with 157 percent increase in revenue and a 113 percent boost in customer growth. Other big news included the acquisition of software technology company Greenshoots Technology in September 2021. Greenshoots provides a white-labelled eCommerce platform for small and medium businesses.

5. Novatti Group (ASX:NOV)

Market cap: AU$148.95 million

Novatti is a multi-services payment provider for businesses and business customers with year on year revenue growth of around 50 percent for each of the past four years. Its customer base is roughly half fintech companies and banks and half traditional merchants and businesses. Novatti has licenses to operate in Australia, New Zealand and Canada and is obtaining licenses in Europe and Singapore.

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Don't forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Ronelle Richards, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

parliament house in the evening. canberra, australia

Cannabis remains a hot-button issue in Australia, and the country's political parties have diverse opinions. Here's a look at what they think.

Cannabis reform at a national level still seems far off for Australians, but what do each of the country's major political parties think about the drug?

At the time of publication, the Australian federal parliament had members in the House of Representatives from nine political parties, and senators from nine political parties as well.

Let's look at what Australia's four major political parties think about cannabis, followed by a brief overview of the minor parties in power. We'll also run through the cannabis-specific political parties not currently elected.


Australian Liberal Party

The Australian Liberal Party is in power right now, and it has a conservative view on drug policy, including cannabis, which it believes should remain on the illicit and illegal drug list. The party also has policies around deporting drug dealers. Although it has endorsed research on medicinal cannabis through the Therapeutics Goods Association (TGA), it has since removed all references and specific policies regarding cannabis from its platform.

Current Health Minister Greg Hunt has expressed concern over the Australian Capital Territory's decision to legalise cannabis given that it directly conflicts with federal law. He previously told ABC Radio Melbourne that cannabis presents a "significant mental health risk."

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has joked that he "won't be partaking" in cannabis. He was also unmoved by activists from the Who Are We Hurting campaign who delivered a pound of weed to Kirribilli House on April 20, 2020, and then brought AU$420,000 in crisp green AU$100 bills to Parliament House on the same date in 2021.

Australian Labour Party

The stance from the Australian Labour Party is in support of medicinal cannabis only. Similar to the Australian Liberal Party, there is no public policy mention of cannabis or marijuana in the Australian Labour Party's mandate.

State members in Queensland and New South Wales have publicly called for the decriminalisation of cannabis, with some going so far as to call for legalisation; however, at this stage the official party line isn't pushing for legalising.

The Nationals

Running on a platform that focuses on rural Australian communities and agriculture, the Nationals often rely on more conservative policies. As part of a coalition government with the Australian Liberal Party, the party line for the Nationals is thought to be aligned as "no" to decriminalisation and "no" to legalisation, but "yes" to medicinal cannabis that is heavily regulated through the TGA.

Australian Greens

The Australian Greens have been proudly (and loudly) lobbying for cannabis legalisation for many years as a major policy. The current party line is to legalise the production, sale and use of cannabis and cannabis products for recreational use, whilst regulating growth and possession for personal and medicinal use.

Minor parties in the House of Representatives

  • Centre Alliance — Member of Parliament Rebekha Sharkie spoke in support of a medicinal cannabis bill in February 2021 and believes medicinal cannabis should be included in the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme.
  • Independent — There are no public policies available for members of parliament Helen Haines, Zali Steggall or Andrew Wilkie, although Wilkie was the major push behind legalising hemp as a material and food source in Australia.
  • Katter's Australia Party — Bob Katter is not pro-legalisation, and joked in parliament, "I didn't know marijuana was legal in Canberra and I can now understand why the country has gone to pot."
  • Liberal Party of Queensland — No public policy; presumed to be the same as the Australian Liberal Party and Nationals as they are a coalition.
  • United Australia Party — The party wants a standard on synthetic dangerous drugs, including cannabis.

Minor parties in the Senate

  • Centre Alliance — Senator Stirling Griff voted against expanding medicinal cannabis in 2017. No public policy on record.
  • Country Liberal Party — The party has no public policy on record.
  • Independent — Senator Rex Patrick voted strongly in favour of increased access to medicinal cannabis, but has previously stated that decriminalising cannabis "requires considerable thought and analysis."
  • Jacqui Lambert Network — The party has policies to address the problems facing everyday Tasmanians in accessing medicinal cannabis, and believes it should be a doctor/patient issue and not a political/bureaucratic issue.
  • Pauline Hanson's One Nation — The party has stated, "One Nation upholds the right of Australians to access medical cannabis, that may give them quality of life and life itself." However, it has a history of blocking motions like the 2017 bid to fast-track medicinal cannabis for the terminally ill.

Pro-cannabis parties in Australian politics

There are several smaller pro-cannabis parties; of particular note is the Legalise Cannabis Australia Party. It was first founded as Help End Marijuana Prohibition (known by its clever and catchy acronym HEMP) in 1993 by Nigel Quinlan, who ran under the candidate name Nigel Freemarijuana.

The group, which changed its name to Legalise Cannabis Australia in September 2021, has a number of policies around legalising and regulating cannabis for personal use, industrial use and medicinal use.

A subgroup of Legalise Cannabis Australia is the Legalise Cannabis Queensland Party, which was officially approved by the Australian Electoral Commission in September 2020 and ran in the October 2020 state election. The party garnered 2.2 percent of the vote, the fourth highest overall. The Legalise Cannabis Western Australia Party won two Upper House seats in the 2021 state election.

The Reason Party (formerly the Australian Sex Party) advocates for cannabis to be legalised, regulated and taxed. The party is currently only represented in the Victorian Legislative Council by Fiona Patton and is not represented at a federal level. Patten recently chaired a foundational committee that provided a report on findings and recommendations on cannabis policy to the Victorian parliament.

Don't forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Ronelle Richards, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.