Peninsula Energy has negotiated a debt restructure with Resource Capital Fund, Pala Investments and Collins Street Value Fund.

Peninsula Energy (ASX:PEN) reported that it has reached agreement with Resource Capital Fund, Pala Investments and entities associated with investment fund Collins Street Value Fund, on the terms of a proposed restructure of the existing US$17 million convertible note facilities, including a planned significant reduction to the principal outstanding and an extension of the repayment date for the balance owing to April 22, 2021.

Highlights are as follows:

  • Agreement to repay majority of outstanding loans through a partial contract monetisation

  • If monetisation completes by 30 April 2020, extension of repayment date of residual debt to 22 April 2021

  • In the unlikely event that the monetisation does not complete by April 30, 2020, all outstanding loan amounts due and payable by October 31, 2020

  • Residual debt amended to straight term loans (convertible component removed) and annual interest rate reduced by 2 percentage points

  • Reduced financial undertakings on residual debt

Wayne Heili, managing director & CEO, commented:

Substantially reducing this debt and strengthening the balance sheet through a non-dilutive mechanism has been a key corporate focus of the company. We are very pleased to have reached agreement with our collective lenders (and shareholders), RCF VI, Pala and the Collins Street entities, to enable this debt reduction, and to extend the remaining loan repayment date until a time where markets have hopefully improved. On behalf of the board I’d like to extend our thanks to the aforementioned parties for their continued support of the company.

Click here to read the whole Peninsula Energy press release.

Featured
Global News

WHAT'S IN STORE FOR THE RESOURCE SECTOR IN 2022?

The Investing News Network (INN) spoke with analysts, market watchers and insiders about which trends will impact this sector in the year ahead.
✓ Trends   ✓ Forecasts    ✓ Top Stocks



read more Show less

Rio Tinto Iron Ore Chief Executive, Simon Trott and Rio Tinto Managing Director of Port, Rail and Core Services, Richard Cohen, joined community members, local businesses and representatives from local government to celebrate the official opening of its new community ‘Hub’ in Karratha. Located on Ngarluma country in the heart of Karratha’s CBD, the new Rio Tinto Karratha Hub will make it easier for local …

Rio Tinto Iron Ore Chief Executive, Simon Trott and Rio Tinto Managing Director of Port, Rail and Core Services, Richard Cohen, joined community members, local businesses and representatives from local government to celebrate the official opening of its new community ‘Hub’ in Karratha.

Located on Ngarluma country in the heart of Karratha’s CBD, the new Rio Tinto Karratha Hub will make it easier for local people to connect with our busines.

read more Show less

Rio Tinto is progressing an innovative new technology to deliver low-carbon steel, using sustainable biomass in place of coking coal in the steelmaking process, in a potentially cost-effective option to cut industry carbon emissions. Over the past decade, Rio Tinto has developed a laboratory-proven process that combines the use of raw, sustainable biomass with microwave technology to convert iron ore to metallic …

Rio Tinto is progressing an innovative new technology to deliver low-carbon steel, using sustainable biomass in place of coking coal in the steelmaking process, in a potentially cost-effective option to cut industry carbon emissions.

Over the past decade, Rio Tinto has developed a laboratory-proven process that combines the use of raw, sustainable biomass with microwave technology to convert iron ore to metallic iron during the steelmaking process. The patent-pending process, one of a number of avenues the company is pursuing to try to lower emissions in the steel value chain, is now being further tested in a small-scale pilot plant.

read more Show less

Where are the silver mines in Australia? You might be surprised to learn that the country is home to one of the world’s top primary silver producers.

Mining is a big part of Australia’s history, and it continues to shape the country’s economy and position in the world today. The nation is one of the world’s top producers and exporters of resources, with coal, uranium, copper and gold being some of its best-known commodities.

Australia is also a key producer of silver — it was the world’s fifth-largest producer of the metal in 2021, tied with Russia, putting out 1,300 MT. Interestingly, most of Australia's silver is produced from silver-bearing galena, but some is also produced from copper and gold mining.

Refined silver comes mainly from the Port Pirie lead smelter and refinery in South Australia, though silver is also refined at gold refineries in Perth, Kalgoorlie and Melbourne.


But where are the silver mines in Australia, exactly? While it’s interesting to know what types of deposits the precious metal is found in, many investors want to know what companies are producing silver and where their mines are located geographically. Read on to find the answers to those questions.

Where are the silver mines in Australia?

Silver has played a role in Australia since the mid-1800s — Wheal Gawler, Australia’s first metal mine, was a silver-lead mine developed in South Australia in the 1840s. And that’s not Australia’s only early silver-mining operation — the Broken Hill deposit in New South Wales and the Mount Isa deposit in Queensland are two other early Australian silver discoveries.

Broken Hill, a lead-zinc-silver deposit, was discovered in 1883 by German immigrant Charles Rasp, and the Broken Hill Proprietary Company was born in 1885; it ultimately merged in 2001 with another mining giant, Billiton, to form BHP Billiton (ASX:BHP,NYSE:BHP,LSE:BLT). BHP Billiton is no longer involved with Broken Hill, but ore is still being extracted there today. Perilya now runs the southern and northern operations.

For its part, Mount Isa was discovered in 1923 by John Campbell Miles, and like Broken Hill is still producing today. It was acquired by Glencore (LSE:GLEN) in 2013 and in addition to silver is also a producer of zinc.

These major early Australian silver discoveries are not the country’s only sources of silver. Other silver mines in Australia include Cannington, one of the world’s top primary silver producers. It’s a fly-in, fly-out mining and processing operation that is owned by South32 (ASX:S32,LSE:S32), a diversified resource company spun out from BHP Billiton in 2015. Cannington also produces lead and zinc.

Australia holds the McArthur River mine as well, which opened in 1995 and is owned by Glencore subsidiary McArthur River Mining. The mine is one of the world’s largest zinc-lead-silver mines, and is located in Australia’s Northern Territory.

Glencore’s 2021 annual report claims total silver production reached 31.519 million ounces for the year, representing a 4 percent drop from 2020. That includes 625,000 ounces from McArthur River.

The Century mine, which previously belonged to MMG (HKEX:1208), shut its doors at the end of 2015, but was a major producer of zinc (and silver) until that time. It was reopened in mid-2018 by New Century Resources (ASX:NCZ) and the company says it now has an estimated annual production capacity of 264,000 tonnes of zinc and 3 million ounces of silver.

Independence Group (ASX:IGO) also produces silver, along with copper and zinc, at its Jaguar operation in Western Australia. Gold producer Silver Lake Resources (ASX:SLR) owns some projects with silver reserves as well. As you can see, there are and have been many silver mines in Australia.

Future silver mines in Australia?

In addition to being home to a slew of large silver mines, Australia also plays host to many companies that are exploring and developing silver projects. Below are a few that have made recent progress.

Please let us know in the comments if we’ve forgotten to mention any Australia-focused silver companies. All companies listed had market caps of at least AU$5 million on May 19, 2022.

Argent Minerals (ASX:ARD) — Argent Minerals’ main asset is its 100-percent-owned Kempfield polymetallic project in New South Wales. In May 2018, the company announced an updated resource estimate for the asset — its silver equivalent contained metal now stands at an estimated 100 million silver equivalent ounces at 120 g/t silver equivalent; that’s approximately double the previous estimate.

In total the company has three projects, with all of them being in New South Wales.

Investigator Resources (ASX:IVR) — Investigator Resources is advancing silver, copper and gold deposits in South Australia. Currently its properties include the Peterlumbo/Paris silver project, the Eyre Peninsula and Stuart Shelf projects and the Northern Yorke Peninsula projects.

The total resource for Paris stands at an estimated 18.8 million tonnes at 88 g/t silver and 0.52 percent lead for 53.1 million ounces of contained silver and 97,600 tonnes of contained lead (at a cut off of 30 g/t silver). The indicated component is 12.7 million tonnes of silver (95 g/t) and represents 73 percent of the total estimated resource ounces.

Horizon Minerals (ASX:HRZ) — Horizon Minerals owns the Nimbus silver-zinc project in Western Australia. Nimbus has a high-grade silver-zinc resource estimate of 255,898 tonnes at 773 g/t silver and 13 percent zinc; the total Nimbus resource stands at 1.21 million tonnes at 52 g/t silver, 0.9 percent zinc and 0.2 g/t gold.

Silver Mines (ASX:SVL) bills itself as a leading Australian silver exploration company, and has spent a considerable amount of time acquiring Australian silver projects. Those include Malachite Resources’ (ASX:MAR) Conrad project and Kingsgate Consolidated’s (ASX:KCN) Bowdens silver project.

While the company’s main focus has been on the Webbs silver project in New South Wales, the Bowdens project represents the largest undeveloped silver project in Australia, and Silver Mines is working to get the project through the feasibility, environmental impact statement and permitting stages.

In a 2018 report, the feasibility study demonstrated an average silver production of 3.4 million tonnes per annum for the project, with 5.4 million during the first three years of operation. Estimations also included 6,900 tonnes of zinc and 5,100 tonnes of lead.

This is an updated version of an article first published by the Investing News Network in 2018.

Don’t forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Ryan Sero, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

various commodities atop a laptop
Maxx-Studio / Shutterstock

“As we've seen in Ukraine, war has supercharged a number of these commodity prices,” John Forwood told RIU Resources Round-Up attendees.

Investment strategies for weathering and benefiting from current market trends were a hot topic at Sydney's recent RIU Resources Round-Up, held in early May.

Current opportunities and potential future ones were highlighted in the keynote address offered by John Forwood, chief investment officer at Lowell Resources Funds Management.

Quoting a February report from the head of commodity research at Goldman Sachs (NYSE:GS), Forwood explained to attendees that we have reached a “molecule crisis” in the commodity space and are essentially “out of everything.”


This deficit has only been compounded by the war in Ukraine, which has further weakened supply fundamentals and chains.

“When the (war in) Ukraine started, about a month later the commodities index (represented by Bloomberg commodities index) had its highest one-week spike on record, and that's a record going back over 60 years,” Forwood said. “As we've seen in Ukraine, war has supercharged a number of these commodity prices.”

However, according to the CIO, there is still a considerable amount of upward growth potential.

“In terms of where we are in terms of that commodity basket, we're way behind where we were in 2008, pre the (global financial crisis) and after the mining boom of the 2000s,” he told the crowd.

“And we're way behind where the Dow Jones and equities in general have got to,” Forwood added. “So, we think that there's potential for the commodity sector to be just getting started.”

There are also several other factors that are adding tailwinds to the broad sector, according to Forwood, who cited inflation — which is at 5 percent in Australia and 7-8 percent in the US and UK — as a significant contributor.

Looking at the longer-term fundamentals that have gotten us here, Forwood pointed to lack of investment capital as a main driver.

“I think the big one, the long term one, is under investment,” he said, noting that the early 2000s mining boom led to a lot of investment, which we aren’t seeing today.

“But over the last seven or eight years, we've seen a real dearth of capital going back into the sector. And in fact, we've also seen a dearth of M&A — something that we've been looking out for and it's just not happening.”

In fact, as one of the slides Forwood presented laid out, investment from the resource industry back into itself reached a 19 year low late last year.

Despite the lack of large investment, Australia’s junior resource index was up 16 percent at the end of April compared to the broader market and the Dow Jones Index, which had slipped 9 percent.

“So that may represent a rotation from other sectors into the resources sector. And if that is the start of what's happening, that could be very, very significant for resource company prices,” he said, explaining the resource sector is actually very small on a global scale.

“And if you see significant global money flowing into that sector, you know, it's almost the sky's the limit,” Forwood added.

Gold and volatility

While speaking about several commodities, the CIO for Lowell Resource Funds Management took time to highlight how gold could also be positioned for an upward trend, because “commodities do best when inflation is rising, and interest rates are rising.”

He then displayed a chart that indicated gold was the top performer among US stocks and the US greenback during the first six months following the commencement of a Fed rate hike period.

Real interest rates, which are hovering around 0 percent, are likely to have no effect on gold's price because, according to the Forwood, rates would have to be 3 percent or higher to impact gold.

He did warn that stagflation could add more wind to the yellow metal’s sails moving forward.

“We think there's a decent chance of (stagflation) occurring, so what should you buy?” he posited. “If you think that stagflation is on its way, well, the answer is also gold.”

Forwood concluded his address by encouraging attendees to invest in the junior resource space.

“Finally, at the Lowell Fund, we like to invest in junior explorers,” he said.

“Because they're the ones who make the discoveries, and discoveries is where you can really add the most value.”

Don’t forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time news updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Georgia Williams, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

Editorial Disclosure: The Investing News Network does not guarantee the accuracy or thoroughness of the information reported in the interviews it conducts. The opinions expressed in these interviews do not reflect the opinions of the Investing News Network and do not constitute investment advice. All readers are encouraged to perform their own due diligence.

Top News

Global News

×