Nickel Stocks in Western Australia

Nickel gets a lot of love these days. Besides its applications as a base metal, it's discovering a rising popularity as an electric vehicle metal thanks to its role in battery technology.

Nickel is a vital component in lithium-ion batteries, which are seeing "hockey stick"-like production rates around the world as electric vehicles become more prevalent.

According to the Australian government, the country holds around 19.7 million tonnes in economic demonstrated reserves of the metal, making it a top nation for nickel reserves, as well as a top nation for nickel production with 180,000 tonnes produced in 2019.

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Western Australia is a key Australian jurisdiction when it comes to nickel. Find out which major nickel stocks in Western Australia investors should watch.

Copper Stocks in South Australia

The state of South Australia is home to the largest copper mine in the country Olympic Dam which is also the fourth largest copper deposit globally.

Olympic Dam, which is a polymetallic mine, is owned by BHP (ASX:BHP,LSE:BHP,NYSE:BHP), and produced about 171,000 tonnes of copper cathode in the 2019 to 2020 financial year. It's located within the Gawler Craton, which is described by the government of South Australia as one of the world's most significant deposits of copper, gold, silver and uranium.

South Australia is the state to beat when it comes to copper — while it's only home to three operational copper mines, it sits on Australia's largest share of copper reserves, accounting for 66 percent of the nation's reserves. Despite this high number, only 27 percent of Australian production is from South Australia.

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South Australia is the state to beat when it comes to copper — while it's home to only three operational copper mines, it sits on Australia's largest share of copper reserves.

ASX Rare Earths Stocks

Rare earths are a group of commodities that Australia has done well to corner the market on, not because of a monopoly on resources (indeed Australia only accounts for 3 percent of global reserves), but because it was ahead of the curve when it comes to investment.

The story of rare earths in Australia — the modern success story at least — has its roots in a 2010 trade dispute between Japan and China, when China throttled exports of rare earths to Japan as retribution for a fisheries clash.

Long story short, Japan found itself looking to diversify its rare earths import partners. Up until then it had been beholden to the whims of its larger neighbour, which at the time accounted for over 93 percent of rare earths output.

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The rare earths market is dominated by China, but Australia is a key player. Here's a look at ASX rare earth stocks with projects on the boil in Australia.

Copper in Australia

Despite its reputation as a major source of coal, iron ore, gold and uranium, Australia is also one of the premier copper-producing jurisdictions in the world, coming in at sixth in production behind the US — or fifth, or seventh — depending on who you ask and on what year.

In 2019, 960,000 metric tons of the red metal came from Australian mines. Notably, the country is home to the world’s fourth largest copper-producing mine, Olympic Dam.

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In 2019, 960,000 metric tons of the red metal came from Australian mines. The country is home to the world’s fourth largest copper-producing mine, Olympic Dam.

How the Australian Dollar Impacts Mining Companies

The currency of Australia — the Australian dollar — is one of the most traded currencies on the planet.

Coming in at fifth globally on the foreign exchange market (FOREX), the Australian dollar is up there with the US dollar, the euro, the British pound and the Japanese yen.

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The Australian economy — and its currency — owes its fortunes to the prolific and profitable mining sector.

Rare Earths in Australia

Rare earths are elements vital to the modern technology age. The 17 elements grouped as rare earths are found in batteries, magnets, lasers, fibre optics, battle tanks, satellites, guided missiles and wind turbines — and that’s just to name a handful of applications.

By Australia’s own account, the land down under only accounts for some 3 percent of the world’s rare earth reserves — well behind China, the global superpower of the rare earths supply chain.

But there is a global focus on Australia as a rare earths player, and China is part of the reason why. Not because China was hungry for rare earths in the same way it is for all the other commodities Australia sells — but because of a trade dispute between China and Japan.

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Although it’s home to producer Lynas, the land down under only accounts for some 3 percent of the world’s rare earth reserves.

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