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Working Solid State Battery Demonstrated at New York Battery Conference

Magnis Resources (ASX:MNS), to be renamed Magnis Energy Technologies Ltd (subject to shareholder approval), is excited to announce that its partner Charge CCCV (C4V) has completed production of a working prototype of a Solid State Battery which was demonstrated at the 2018 NYBEST Conference in New York by C4V.

  • Magnis Partner C4V has developed one of the world’s first working prototype of a Solid State
    Battery
  • Successful demonstration unveiled at the 2018 NYBEST Conference in New York
  • Battery volumetric capacity currently 380Wh/kg and 700Wh/L, with expected further
    optimisation towards 400Wh/kg and 750Wh/L
  • Targeted commercial production with availability by Q2 2019
  • New battery will lead towards lower production costs and does not rely on cobalt, reducing supply
    constraints in mass production

Magnis Resources (ASX:MNS), to be renamed Magnis Energy Technologies Ltd (subject to shareholder approval), is excited to announce that its partner Charge CCCV (C4V) has completed production of a working prototype of a Solid State Battery which was demonstrated at the 2018 NYBEST Conference in New York by C4V.

C4V Solid State Battery Production

C4V’s new Solid State Battery, replaces more than 80% of the liquid electrolyte with a solid electrolyte. This effectively produces a lower cost battery that is higher capacity, higher density, higher performance, and with significantly reduced charging times than existing battery solutions. Further, C4V’s battery does not require cobalt which contributes to the reduction of costs and an increase in scalability of production without metals supply constraints.

The prototype Solid State Battery demonstrated in New York has volumetric capacities of 380Wh/kg and 700 Wh/L which is expected to increase to 400Wh/kg and 750 Wh/L through optimisation over the coming months prior to production for commercial availability by Q2 2019.

As an example of the capabilities of this battery in current implementations, the C4V Solid State Battery will be capable of delivering a 70% increase in range for electric vehicles when compared to other batteries, allowing an electric car with
a current 400km range to be able to run 680km on the same single charge.

C4V is working alongside commercial supply chains to further refine and optimise compositions, chemical structure, particle morphologies, and electrode processing techniques to develop solutions for tailored applications including electric vehicles, grid backup solutions, aviation, and portable electronics.

Commentary

C4V President Shailesh Upreti commented: “We are very excited about our developments in moving to a production-ready Solid State Battery design. C4V has taken a commercial approach in its development process for its next-
generation product. C4V’s new Solid State Battery is drop-in ready, reducing disruption on the manufacturing floor, whilst reducing production cost and increasing production quality.

“C4V continues to work closely with our strategic partners, including Magnis, as well as our established supply chain partners to bring C4V’s latest innovation to market.”

Magnis Chairman Frank Poullas commented: “This is one of the world’s first Solid State Batteries to be produced. Volkswagen Group recently invested US$100 Million into US-Based QuantumScape which is yet to publicly produce a prototype and is targeting Solid State Battery production in 2025. The investment by Volkswagen valued QuantumScape at over US$1 Billion.”

“Our technology continues to gain serious interest and we look forward to announcing further developments in the coming quarters.”

Figure 1: C4V Third Generation Solid State Battery

PLEASE FIND THE C4V PRESS RELEASE BELOW

-ENDS-

For further information, please contact:
Travis Peluso
Investor Relations Director
Ph: +61 411 404 814
www.magnis.com.au

Follow Magnis Resources on Twitter:
https://twitter.com/magnisresources

C4V’s new solid state battery has arrived and is now on the road to mass production in New York

• Working prototype showcased by C4V at the NYBEST 2018 Fall Conference in New York
• Battery’s Energy Density of 380Wh/kg achieved without cobalt
• System-level testing of the new battery now underway for strategic offtake partner

Charge CCCV, LLC (C4V) today demonstrated a prototype of its new Solid State Battery (SSB) at the NY BEST 2018 Fall Conference in New York. The Company’s SSB solution delivers higher performance, higher density, lower cost batteries that promise to require significantly less charging time than others.

The Technology

C4V has been able to replace more than 80% of the liquid electrolyte with a solid electrolyte producing a semi-solid-state technology with an energy density of approximately 380Wh/kg.

This technology will provide a remarkable 70% range increase for every Electric Car that employs the C4V Solid State Battery. An Electric Vehicle today, currently capable of a 300-mile range, would with C4V’s technology be able to extend its range to 510 miles on a single charge.

The C4V Generation 3 Battery utilizes energy densities and volumetric capacities of 380Wh/kg and 700 Wh/L and the Company is already targeting a 400Wh/kg and 750 Wh/lit milestone within the next six month timeframe before commercial process optimization starts. In the first half of 2019, C4V plans to announce the availability of its commercial cells to the market.

The Company is working alongside commercial supply chains to fine-tune the compositions, chemical structures, particle morphologies and electrode processing techniques for tailored applications such as Electric Vehicles, grid back-ups, aviation needs and portable electronics requirements.

Dr. Shailesh Upreti, founder and President of C4V, emphasized in a statement today that: “It is our mission at C4V to discover solutions that solve problems lying at the materials level to create value at the Lithium-ion Battery and system level. Our unique materials technology not only reduces the cost of batteries significantly, it promises to provide relief to certain key metal supply constraints.”

Dr. Upreti went on further to say: “C4V’s global joint venture companies are achieving price reductions through economies of scale by adopting its innovations. Our first generation high power and energy density batteries do not employ the use of cobalt, instead use higher voltage composite material in combination with other abundant raw materials and thus greatly reduce costs, while relying on a less volatile supply chain.”

At today’s NYBEST Annual Conference, Dr. Upreti showcased the new technology by lighting an LED with a prototype of C4V’s SSB stating in summary that, “We are very excited about these new developments in the Solid State Battery segment. C4V has taken a commercial approach to developing material and designs for its next generation product. We are able to demonstrate the drop-in nature of our technology which thus eliminates costly disruptions on the manufacturing floor”.

C4V continues to work closely with strategic partners as well as their established supply chain partners to bring its s latest innovations to market.”

A video of Solid State Battery Cell can be seen at: C4V Solid State Battery Video

Media contact
Tammy Polmanteer
Ph: +1-607-224-2225
Email: admin@c4v.us

Source: drive.google.com

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The move comes following international pressure as Australia had previously refused to join countries in pledging to meet the target ahead of the United Nations' COP26 climate conference in Glasgow.

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"We want our heavy industries, like mining, to stay open, remain competitive and adapt, so they remain viable for as long as global demand allows," Morrison said. "We will not support any mandate — domestic or international — to force closure of our resources or agricultural industries."

Australia's desire to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 is a step in the right direction, Prakash Sharma, Wood Mackenzie's Asia Pacific head of markets and transitions, said.

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According to Wood Mackenzie, nearly 83 percent of Australia's power generation will come from solar and wind by 2050, as compared to about 20 percent last year. Natural gas, bio energy, geothermal and small modular reactors will supply the remaining 17 percent in power output. Coal into power is expected to be phased out by 2035.

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Meanwhile, the Australian Conservation Foundation has welcomed the prime minister's commitment to reach net zero by 2050, but said the mid-century goal is only meaningful with deep cuts to climate pollution this decade.

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"Australia can become a global clean energy superpower in the next decade by replacing coal and gas with renewable energy," she added. "We have abundant clean energy, tools and talent, but we cannot delay any longer."

Don't forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Priscila Barrera, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.

map showing Victoria, Australia

The state of Victoria completed an inquiry on cannabis earlier this year. Will it actually change anything for the drug?

In August, the government of Victoria, Australia, released the results of its inquiry into the use of cannabis, taking into account 1,475 written submissions, dozens of expert witnesses and two minority reports.

A few months on, Australia-focused cannabis investors are wondering whether the document's findings will have an impact on cannabis use in the state, or even in the country as a whole.

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Why did Victoria conduct a cannabis inquiry?

Back in May 2019, Victoria's Legislative Council Legal and Social Issues Committee agreed to complete an inquiry on cannabis in the state. Although it was initially due for completion in March 2020, the deadline was extended twice, first to March 2021 and then again to August 2021.

Chaired by Reason Party Member of Parliament Fiona Patten, whose party supports legalising cannabis, the committee broadly looked at two streams of cannabis policy reform. One, the legalisation of cannabis for adult personal use, and two, a legalised and regulated cannabis market.

The report puts forth 17 recommendations and 21 findings, but Patten said after its release that the Labor-heavy committee banded together to water down certain recommendations prior to the drafting of the report.

For example, according to reports from the Age, the first recommendation of legalising cannabis for adult personal use in Victoria became "Recommendation 1: That the Victorian Government investigates the impacts of legalising cannabis for adult personal use in Victoria."

Evidence from the inquiry suggests that legalising cannabis would keep young and vulnerable people out of the criminal justice system, with state parliament estimates suggesting Victoria would save AU$725 million over 10 years in police and justice costs.

Key highlights from Victoria's cannabis inquiry

Recommendations from the report broadly fall several categories: investigating a legalised and regulated market; health and safety; and education for minors.

Here's a wrap up of the main items the Victorian government was told to look at:

  • Investigate the impact of legalising cannabis for adult personal use in Victoria.
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  • Provide ongoing funding to alcohol and drug sector organisations for drug diversion programs, and further funding to areas in regional and rural Victoria.
  • Implement a road safety campaign about the dangers of driving under the influence of cannabis.
  • Look at alternative testing methods for "drug driving," as current methods mean THC can be detected in a person's system long after being "affected by the drug," especially in the case of medicinal cannabis patients.
  • Advocate to the National Cabinet to remove unnecessary barriers for accessing medicinal cannabis.
  • Seek expert help on school drug education, avoid stigmatising users and promote help-seeking behaviour.

Minority reports included in Victoria's inquiry

Liberal Democrat David Limbrick, who participated in the inquiry, was "extremely disappointed" with the last-minute changes mentioned above and submitted a minority report in favour of legalisation.

It broadly supports the public policy Liberal Democrats have towards cannabis which is: "The Liberal Democrats support the legalisation of use, cultivation, processing, possession, transport and sale of cannabis, with protection of minors and penalties for driving while impaired."

A second minority report is also included — it comes from the Liberals and Nationals, both of which are firmly against legalising cannabis in order to protect public health and children. Signed by three members, it states that legalising cannabis only provides ready access and no deterrent to prevent cannabis use. They further wrote:

"The Liberals and Nationals support drug education programs warning of the harms of illicit substances, we support diversion programs that help get people off drugs, and we support other support services for those addicted to drugs. However, we do not support legalising cannabis."

Victoria Police Assistant Commissioner Glenn Weir told the inquiry in June that the use, cultivation and trafficking of marijuana causes "significant harm," and said he is firmly opposed to legalisation.

Will the inquiry impact cannabis legalisation in Australia?

Any hopes of legalisation were quickly dashed after the report's release by Victorian Premier Dan Andrews, whose focus is on job creation and economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

Speaking to reporters after it came out, he said he has "no intention" of legalising cannabis.

"If you want to know why, then have a look at the sections in the mental health royal commission that talk about dual diagnosis, drug-induced psychosis," he told reporters outside parliament.

"Others have a different view, they're entitled to have a different view, but as the leader of the government I've just made the government's position very clear."

The lack of support by major state parties for the Victorian inquiry may speak to a wider delay nationally for supporting decriminalising and legalising cannabis. Combined with the narrow defeat of the cannabis legalisation referendum in New Zealand, it does not look like legalisation is likely anytime soon.

Don't forget to follow us @INN_Australia for real-time updates!

Securities Disclosure: I, Ronelle Richards, hold no direct investment interest in any company mentioned in this article.